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FAQ

Q.  How do I get help if I have issues or problems with my service?
A.

If you are experiencing a technical problem affecting your service, please call our 24-hour customer support number at

1-800-454-7214.

 

If you already have login credentials you can log into our online HelpDesk here.

 

If you would like to receive a username and password to the HelpDesk call our 24-hour customer support number for assistance.

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Q.  Who has access to my account?
A.

Only you have access to your account external from the technical support team at Syringa Networks.

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Q.  Can others in my company view my requests and issue status?
A.

Yes. Please contact Syringa Networks during office hours at 1-208-229-6100. We will associate your company profiles to you as the requestor. Permissions will then be set accordingly.

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Q.  How do I make changes to my service?
A.

Syringa Networks would be happy to talk to you about how we can help tailor solutions to any of your networking needs. Your account representative is always ready to talk. If you do not know who your account representative is, you may call the main office at 1-208-229-6100 or by emailing us at sales@syringanetworks.net.

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Q.  Whom do I contact to establish new services?
A.

Syringa Networks is always prepared and ready to talk about how we can provide the right service and solution to business customers. You can reach any of our experienced sales executives by calling our main office at 1-208-229-6100 or by emailing us at sales@syringanetworks.net.

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Q.  Does Syringa Networks provide residential network services?
A.

Not at this time. Our focus is serving business customers to enable new market access statewide.

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Q.  Whom do I contact for billing issues or questions?
A.

Direct contact information is provided on all customer invoices. Please call our main office at 208-229-6100 and you will be directed to our accounting department.

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Q.  Where is Syringa Networks located?
A.

Syringa Networks’ main office is located in Boise, Idaho at 12301 W Explorer Dr.

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Q.  What services does Syringa Networks offer?
A.

Syringa Networks offers a wide array of telecommunication solutions and services that can be tailored to fit most any business broadband application need. To read about our products and services you can view them on our “Solutions” page.

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Q.  How does your network architecture compare with other providers in the service area?
A.

 Most national providers have a limited number of edge devices that allow for customer access within a given state. Because our network architecture is based on a regional approach, we offer many more edge devices within the states we service than larger providers. This means that we are able to offer reduced network latencies, increased service reliability, and expanded customer access.

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Q.  How does Syringa Networks monitor customer circuits and services?
A.

 Our Network Surveillance Center (NSC) is staffed 24-7 to respond to any issues that are identified in a timely manner. For circuits that have our premise equipment installed, we utilize an SNMP-based management system to monitor premise equipment using automated queries and traps.

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Q.  Does Syringa Networks offer Virtual Private LAN Service (VPLS)?
A.

 Yes, Syringa Networks offers VPLS for customers who require a Layer 2 switched Ethernet service for multipoint, full-mesh connectivity.

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Q.  Why is Syringa Networks infrastructure better?
A.

 No other provider in Idaho can match the low latency that our network provides, which is typically less than 15ms. This is made possible by our nine core routers, 38 provider edge routers in LATA 652 in a diverse, ringed topology around the state.

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Q.  Can optical fiber be used for longer distances than copper cabling can?
A.

 Optical fiber allows data to be sent far greater distances than copper cabling, and it requires less repeater devices than are required by other types of cabling. With copper cabling, high bandwidth can be transmitted, but only for short distances.

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Q.  How secure is optical fiber?
A.

 Optical fiber cabling provides an extremely secure transmission medium. This is due to the fact that there is no way to detect the data being transmitted by “listening in” to the electromagnetic signal as is possible with traditional copper. Since fiber optic cabling does not radiate magnetic fields; the light (photons) is confined within the fiber which makes it impossible to tap the signal without cutting into the fiber.

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Q.  Who uses MPLS-based IP-VPN?
A.

 Over the past few years, the benefits of private MPLS-based IP-VPNs have been realized by many different users in state and local government, education, and business enterprises. According to a recent International Data Corporation (IDC) survey, over 30% of all enterprises are using IP-VPN today.

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Q.  What does MPLS stand for and what is it?
A.

 MPLS (multiprotocol label switching) is a protocol used to improve packet performance and control traffic in the core of the Internet and private IP networks that originated from tag switching methods created by Ipsilon Networks and Cisco Systems in the late 1990s. While it continues to be widely used for that purpose, it has also been adapted for other uses. MPLS encapsulates data packets, adding packet headers that enable a variety of features which are in wide use in business-critical services.

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Q.  What is a Private MPLS-Based IP-VPN?
A.

 A VPN (virtual private network) links two or more devices together via a local or wide-area network, while encapsulating the data and keeping it private. There are several types of VPNs in use today, but in general VPNs can be categorized as either public or private.

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Q.  What is the difference between public and private VPNs?
A.

 A Public VPN, sometimes referred to as a CPE-based VPN, utilizes the public Internet as the core transport backbone. A Private VPN, usually referred to as a MPLS IP-VPN, utilizes a service provider’s private infrastructure as the transport backbone for the VPN.

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Q.  Why use a Private MPLS-Based IP-VPN?
A.

 MPLS-based IP-VPN is a rapidly expanding technology that provides a number of advantages to its users such as scalability, security, redundancy, and operational efficiencies. Although certain limitations exist, they are easily out-weighed with wide industry support, the security of a service provider’s private backbone, and the ability to utilize any transport which all adds up to a cost-effective, secure VPN solution.

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Q.  What is the difference between Static Routing and BGP?
A.

 Static routing is simple but less scalable than BGP. It works well for organizations that need redundant Internet at a single location. When you require redundancy to the Internet, BGP presents many options that static routing is unable to achieve. These include load-balancing and diversity between hardware, providers, and geographical areas.

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Q.  Can Syringa Networks provide Interlata connectivity from Idaho to the rest of the country?
A.

 Syringa Networks has strategic relationships with Interlata transport providers, and with other “Syringa Networks Like” companies across the nation. We provide access and backhaul services where we are the customer’s single point of contact, and take ownership of each individual circuit element back to the customer’s network.

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Q.  Does Syringa Networks bundle equipment and network services?
A.

 Syringa Networks can configure and bundle equipment with our network services, or interface with existing customer premise equipment. If we are working with equipment already in place, we have the knowledge and expertise to assist with device configuration, including command line interface.

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Q.  Can IPv4 MPLS Backbone be used with IPv6?
A.

 If you are a large Internet Service Provider or Enterprise, you may have implemented MPLS throughout your IPv4 network. Utilizing the existing IPv4 MPLS backbone, you can quickly offer IPv6 services with a technology called 6PE (IPv6 Provider Edge).

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Q.  Can BGP be used at several locations?
A.

 If your organization is geographically diverse, BGP will allow you to take in Internet connections to several locations, from several providers all over the world, while maintaining a single “presence” on the internet. It also allows you to load balance between multiple connections and providers.

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Q.  For a single location which is preferred: Static Routing or BGP?
A.

 Static routing is the simpler way to multi-home for organizations working from a single location. However, BGP is much more scalable and flexible for large, multi-campus companies and organizations.

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Q.  What is the difference between copper cabling and fiber optic networks?
A.

 Generally, copper cabling has a limited bandwidth capability due to the physical properties of copper over distance; whereas optical fiber has a virtually unlimited bandwidth capability. This enables optical fiber to provide data transmission performance up to 10Gbps, 40Gbps, and even 100Gbps with new hardware that is now available. This provides network designers an easier path for bandwidth upgrades in the future.

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Q.  Does Syringa Networks have a NOC?
A.

 Syringa Networks has a Network Surveillance Center (NSC) in Idaho Falls that is operated 24x7x365. The NSC monitors networks where we have SNMP manageable devices.

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Q.  What is the difference between IPv4 and IPv6 address space?
A.

 IPv6 has extended the address field from 32 bits to 128 bits, or 340 trillion, trillion, trillion addresses. This is a great deal more than the 4.3 billion addresses possible with IPv4.

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Q.  What equipment is needed for IPv6?
A.

 You will need to determine if your LAN equipment can support IPv6 to IPv4 in a dual stack. Be sure that your network security equipment supports the processing of IPv6 in hardware and software. For example, some, but not all Cisco routers and switches process packets in hardware using CEF (Cisco Express Forwarding) technology. Contact us for a site assessment and we can analyze your existing configuration.

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Q.  Can BGP be used on multiple routers?
A.

 BGP allows you to bring diverse Internet connections into multiple routers. Each router would peer with upstream provider(s) over what is called an E-BGP (external) link. Internally, your routers would peer with each other over an I-BGP (internal) link. This allows them to all be in sync, and to alert each other when a BGP path is down.

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Q.  Does Syringa Networks support MPLS?
A.

 Syringa Networks core network natively supports MPLS, VPLS, and Psuedo wire. A customer can opt for MPLS tag switched Layer 3 connectivity with either static routes or BGP route distribution.

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